Jackson Hole Attractions

Jackson Hole Activities

Jackson Hole Activities

Image of sign showing Jackson Hole Activities

Posts from Massage Professionals of Jackson Hole now include Jackson Hole Activities. Occasionally moving away from typical massage-based blog posts, I am continuing with a Jackson Hole Activities theme. And this week, it’s one of the favorite Jackson Hole Activities. But don’t let that stop you – visitors to Jackson Hole can have a hoot with this one too. Yes, visitors to Jackson Hole can become a ‘Howdy-for-A-Day’ and volunteer with local business people (members of the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce) for a day of welcoming people to ‘The Hole’.

 

The Howdy Pardner Ambassador Club hosts the Airport Welcome program on weekends during ski season at the Jackson Hole Airport. It’s one of the most popular Jackson Hole Activities. Look for the cowboy hats and stop by to say, “Howdy!” The volunteers will share orange juice and mimosas with arriving visitors. They will also answer questions about Jackson Hole. 

 

The Howdy Pardners Ambassador Club, founded in 1977, is the hospitality arm of the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce. Dressed like the cowboys and cowgirls who settled this valley in the early 1900’s, the Howdy Pardners roll out the red carpet at the Jackson Hole Airport. They greet visitors with mimosas, orange juice and hatpins. And that’s just one of the many Jackson Hole Activities.

But that’s not all they do: The Howdy Pardners Ambassador Club spreads good will and community spirit within the Jackson Hole area. Howdy Pardner volunteers are folks working in our area that donate their time to perform various activities, such as:

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  • Meet and greet arriving visitors at the Jackson Hole Airport each winter with welcoming free “mimosas” for adults and orange juice for the kids. 
  • Sponsor the much anticipated “Jackson Hole 4th of July Parade”.
  • Host the Elk Fest Chili Cook-Off in early May.
  • Sponsor “Pinky Painting” in the Park for children at the annual “The Taste of the Tetons” during the Fall Arts Festival.
  • Hhelp showcase new businesses in Jackson by performing ribbon cutting ceremonies and participating in business community mixers. 
  • Howdy Pardners are easily recognized by their signature uniforms of jeans, red shirts or khaki shirts with the “Howdy Pardners” logo on the arm. They also wear a vest and cowboy hats.

 

Be well,

Hamish and Rochelle.

Jackson Hole Activities – Visit the National Elk Refuge

Jackson Hole Activities – Visit the National Elk Refuge

 

In our work as massage therapists in Jackson Hole, where our clients are often from out of town, we find ourselves as a resource of information about the area. So this blog will now occasionally cover the many wonderful things there are for people to do while in Jackson Hole. With summer season coming right along, We’ll cover events and activities, from ‘mainstream’ tourism attractions, to more subtle activities and organizations etc. – more for locals’ participation.

 

With the near-record heavy snows of February and early March now on the wane, spring has come to Jackson Hole with warm mid-day temperatures and lingering light, and this is no more obvious than on the National Elk Refuge. The refuge abuts the Eastern portion of the town of Jackson and thousands of elk (official count just in this month 1s 11,600)  can be seen across the vast expanse of the Elk Refuge as it spreads out north towards Grand Teton National Park and east to the Gros Ventre Mountains. It’s mid-March and time for bull elk to start shedding their antlers – which they will do through April. Soon after shedding, their new velveted antler growth begins. During April and May, elk begin drifting from the Refuge, following the receding snowline toward their summer ranges in the high country. Calves are born in protected areas along the migration route in late May and June.

 

Birds flock to the refuge during their spring migration. Yes, there’s more than just elk here – the refuge preserves and restores habitat for endangered species, birds, fish and other big-game animals such as Bison. It’s not unusual to see coyotes, bear, red fox and even wolves there.

 

 

The next three months will bring much activity to the elk refuge as they prepare to start their migration and eventually move to their summer habitats. While there’s still snow on the ground, an excellent way to see this up-close and personal is by taking a horse-drawn sleigh-ride right in among the herds.

 

There’s plenty of information to be had about this on the National Elk Refuge’s web site.   Jackson Hole’s National Elk Refuge is run by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. And after you’re all done with that…a nice massage would be just the thing to finish off the day – don’t you think?

Be well, Hamish and Rochelle.